Information regarding our Hospitals, Primary Health Centers  (PHC) and Clinics:-

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Hospitals

The Department of Health runs seven hospitals in Tibetan settlements spread across India. These hospitals provide health services to a population ranging from 5,000 to 16,000. They treat on an average 50-100 patients daily and are well equipped with all basic diagnostic and treatment facilities like eye clinic, (minor) operation theatre, laboratory unit, x-ray machine, dental unit, maternity ward, TB isolation ward, inpatient wards for male and female, pharmacy, physiotherapy scanning, 24 hours ambulance services, free immunization, etc.

Health conditions commonly treated in these hospitals are upper and lower respiratory tract infection, Tuberculosis, gastroenteritis, blood pressure, diabetics, waterborne diseases, eye-related problems, hypertension, arthritis, viral fever, joint pain, skin allergies diseases, Dental problem, Gastritis, Back pain, Abdominal pain, Typhoid, Diarrhea, Anemia, ear infection and delivery cases etc.

The medical services provided by the hospitals also include a wide range of other programs: MCH (Mother and Child Health) and RH (Reproductive Health) Program, HIV Program, Mental Health Program, Destitute Medical Program, TB Program, Program for (People with) Disabilities, Tibetan Medicare System Program (TMS), etc.

The hospital premises and buildings usually consist of two blocks: administrative and medical. The administrative block includes the office of hospital administrator, conference hall, health information section, health education section, patient’s record room, generator room, garage, staff quarters, staff kitchen, etc.

The medical block includes outpatient department (OPD), emergency room, dressing-cum-injection room, pharmacy, laboratory, x-ray room, nurses room, Minor OT, dental section, eye section, general inpatient ward, counselling room, examination room, TB ward, maternity and computerised billing counter.

The staff members of the hospitals are appointed by the Department as per the Tibetan Voluntary Health Association staff Rules and Regulation guidelines. These hospitals are administered through an autonomous board of management. The daily management of hospitals is supervised by the hospital administrator, while the medical division of the hospital is headed by a chief medical officer. It goes without saying that the construction of hospital buildings, as well as the daily functioning of the hospital, are carried out in strict conformance to the relevant Indian state laws and regulations on private medical establishments.

Mainpat hospital

The Mainpat hospital was founded in 1986 in order to provide basic health care services to Tibetans as well as the local Indian populace. Before the inception of this health center, the settlement people (initially numbering 1,700) suffered major health problems. Since the settlement was located in a remote region, access to proper health care facilities was particularly difficult. This is the main reason why the settlement population has diminished significantly over the years. Fully equipped with basic treatment facilities, the center today has total 9 medical and non-medical staff, including 1 accountant, 2 staff nurse, 2 community health worker, 1 pharmacist, 1 ophthalmic technician, 1 sweeper and 1 driver.

Dekyiling Hospital

Dekyiling Health CentreDekyiling Tibetan settlement was initially built to rehabilitate the Tibetan refugees who have migrated from Bhutan. The Tibetan refugees from Bhutan are in Dekyiling with scattered Tibetan of Mussoorie, Rajpur and Hardwar. The Dekyiling settlement people initially earned their livelihood by weaving carpet at the handicraft center of settlement.

With funding assistance from the Health Department and various foreign donors, a primary health center was established in 1986. At that time, the settlement had a population of nearly 2,000.

The health center at the Dekyiling settlement is one of the largest and serves as the central referral point for various other health centers located around the city of Dehradun, at Rajpur, Khera, Lakhanwala, Clementown and Manduwala.

The settlement’s health center has a combined total of 14 medical and non-medical staff members, including 2 Doctors, 1 hospital administrator, 1 lab./x-ray technician, 4 staff nurses, 1 auxiliary nurse, 1 community health worker, 1 accountant, 1 driver, 1 sweeper and 1 cook. The health center not only provides basic medical services, but also undertakes various preventive and promotive aspects of public health programs.Mainpat Hospital

 

 

Menlha Hospital, Odisha

IMG_3830The Phuntsokling Tibetan settlement is located in the eastern Indian state of Odisha. What is today the Menlha Hospital was only a small clinic when His Holiness the Dalai Lama first inaugurated in February 1979. The population of the settlement has decreased from the initial 3,000 to about 2,500 in 2012. The hospital today has total 12 medical and non-medical staff members, including 1 hospital administrator, 1 x-ray/lab. technician, 1 accountant, 2 staff Nurses, 1 cashier/ office secretary, 1 dental therapist, 2 community health workers, 1 watchman, 1 driver and 1 sweeper.

In addition to providing medical comprehensive services to the Tibetan settlers and the local Indian population, the hospital also carries a whole host of health programs ranging from free immunization and MCH to health awareness talks and outreach events. In case of serious patients who require intensive in-patient treatment, the hospital refers them to the nearest city hospital of Bahrampur.

Phende Hospital, Hunsur

Phende Hospital, HunsurThe Hunsur Tibetan settlement was established in 1972 with an initial population of 3,200. The settlement’s Phende hospital was established in 1974 with funding assistance from the Board of Trustees of Common Project of European Refugee Campaign. Its foundation stone was laid down by then state Chief Minister Shri Devaraj Urs.

The hospital was managed by the Mysore Rehabilitation and Development Agency until 1976. It was later handed over to the settlement’s cooperative society. The Department took complete charge of the hospital in the late 1980’s.The hospital at present has 13 staff members both the medical and non-medical including 1 hospital administrator, 1 accountant, 2 staff nurse, 1 pharmacist, 1 lab. technician, 3 community health workers, 1 driver, 1 cook/laundry, 1 sweeper and 1 watchman.

In addition to quality medical services, the hospital also carries out a wide range of programs like organizing health awareness events, installation of medical camps for early detection and treatment of diseases, etc.

Tso-Jhe Khangsar Charity Hospital, Bylakuppe

Located in the south Indian state of Karnataka, Lugsung Samdupling and Dekyi Larsoe settlements in Bylakuppe together constitute the largest Tibetan settlement in India. While Lugsung Samdupling was founded in 1962 with an initial population of 11,500, Dekyi Larsoe started in 1970 with 3,500 people. As of 2012, the combined population of Bylakuppe was 22,000.

The Tso-Jhe Khangsar Charity Hospital was founded in 1982. Initially, it had 15 staff members. After constructing new hospital buildings with funding assistance from Italy, the hospital was formally inaugurated by His Holiness the Dalai Lama in August 1995. His Holiness conferred the name Tso-jhe Khangsar to the hospital.

In order to cater to the growing health needs of the two settlements in Bylakuppe and in addition to a significant local Indian population, the hospital today has a combined total of 22 medical and non-medical staff members, including 1 Doctor, 1 hospital administrator, 1 dental therapist, 1 accountant, 3 staff Nurses, 5 community health workers, 2 lab technician/ x-ray, 1 opthalmic technician, 1 pharmacist, 1 office secretary/cashier, 1 driver, 1 cook, 1 watchman and 2 sweepers.

The institution also runs or governs the health care center at Chawkur, one of the farest camps.

Doeguling Tibetan Resettlement Hospital Association (DTR), Mundgod

DTR Hospital, MondgodThe DTR hospital started with a single room clinic in 1967. At that time, the clinic had two beds with only a handful of staff members. The present day DTR hospital building was inaugurated on 1 January 1970. At that time, it operated under the Mysore Rehabilitation and Development Agency (MYRADA), a non-profit organization. The Department took charge of the hospital in 1993.

Located in the South Indian state of Karnataka, the Doeguling Tibetan Settlement is the second largest in India. As of 2008, the settlement has a population of over 16,994 out of which 9,020 were monks.

The DTR Hospital is equipped with all basic diagnostic and treatment equipment. It treats a daily average of about 30 patients. The hospital has a combined total of 26 medical and non-medical staff members, which includes 1 Doctor (MBBS), 1 Dentist, 1 hospital administrator, 4 staff nurse, 1 Nurse Aid, 6 community health workers, 1 Lab. technician, 1 x-ray technician, 1 pharmacist, 1 accountant, 2 Sweeper, 1 peon, 2 watchman, 1 driver/plumber, 2 cooks.

Kollegal Dhondenling Van Thiel Charitable Trust Hospital

Dhondenling Van Thiel Charitable Trust Hospital, KollegalDhondenling Tibetan settlement is the third largest Tibetan settlement in India. With a current population of about 5,500, the settlement is located in the south Indian state of Karnataka, at a remote location with extremely poor transportation and communication links.

The Dhondenling Van Thiel (DVT) Charitable Trust Hospital was founded in 1974 by a non-profit organization MYRADA (Mysore Rehabilitation and Development Agency). Since the Department took full charge of the hospital in 1986, it has over the years grown to be one of the largest Tibetan hospitals in India.

Fully equipped with basic diagnostic and treatment facilities, the hospital provides quality services to both the Tibetan settlers and the local Indian population. The hospital treats daily about 60 to 100 patients. It has 18 medical and non-medical staff members, including 1 Doctor (MBBS), 1 hospital administrator, 2 staff nurses, 4 community health workers, 1 lab/x-ray technician, 1 ophthalmic nurse, 1 pharmacist, 1 Dental Therapist, 1 accountant, 1 cashier/office secretary, 1 peon, 1 driver, 1 sweeper and 1 watchman.

Primary Health Centers (PHC)

 

The Department runs a network of four primary health care centers in Tibetan settlements with population ranging variously from 1,000 to 7,500.These health centers are fully equipped with basic medical equipment and treatment facilities. Many of these centers treat as many as 50 patients every day. Three of these centers have resident doctors, while the remaining have a visiting doctor once every week or two weeks.

They provide a wide range of treatment facilities including OPD consultation, dressing room, pharmacy, laboratory, delivery room (equipped with oxygen and incubator), immunization, in-patient ward, nebulizer, ECG, x-ray, dental ward, physiotherapy, 24 hours emergency services, etc. These centers also provide ambulance services and provide home visits to the elderly or bed-ridden patients.

Alongside the curative aspect of the medical services, these centers also undertakes a wide range of preventive and promotive health programs, including MCH and RH program, Tibetan Medicare System, health education, Hep/HIV counselling programs, Tuberculosis DOT, etc.

The daily administration of centers are supervised by the settlement officers. All medical and non-medical staff of hospitals and Primary health centers are recruited by the Health Department in strict adherence to the relevant rules and regulations of the Central Tibetan Administration.

Primary Health Center, Delhi

Delhi PHCThe primary health center in Majnu-Ka-Tilla, Delhi was built in 1993 with generous funding assistance from Mr. Fabien Quaki through Medicines Du Monde. At that time, the health center operated with one staff nurse and a dental therapist. Today, the center has 3 staff nurses with a visiting doctor twice a week. The clinic provides comprehensive basic health care services to the settlement population of over 2,500. The health center functions under the overall supervision of the settlement officer.

“Fosco Maraini” Tibetan Primary Health Center, Choglamsar Ladakh

The Sonamling Tibetan settlement in Choglamsar, Ladakh was established in late 1960’s. The settlement consists of two different groups, viz. Choglamsar and Jangthang. As of April 2013, out of a total population of 7,434, nearly two-third, 5,154, are settled in Choglamsar. The remaining, 2,280, are based in the nomadic area of Jangthang.Ladakh PHC

Child’s right organization, Save the Children Fund set up four small health care centers in Choglamsar. These health centers provided basic health care services until they were closed down in 1992. The Department took charge of these health centers in the same year. The health centers resumed providing basic health care services to the settlement people. These health centers located in Choglamsar operate as the main center, while the other three located in Menlha, Choglam and Angling serve as sub-centers.

With the growing public need and demand for a mobile clinic facility in the nomadic area of Jangthang, the department closed down one of the existing health centers and started operating a mobile ambulance clinic. The mobile clinic covered the nomadic areas of Sumdho, Sameth, Kharnak, Nyoma, Chummur, Hanley, Goyul, hanle and Kakshung. The sole remaining nomadic area of Jangthang Chushul has a separate health sub-center functioning with one health worker.

From April 2014, branch clinic at Sumdho Jangthang area is going to have 2 resident staff nurse and 1 driver. This branch clinic will function direct under the main health center at Choglamsar. They will do monthy visit to 9 areas of Jangthang.

In 2012, the Primary Health care center was constructed through the support by Fondo Samaritano Radici of Bergamo (Italy) and Africa Tremila, NGO and Italy Tibet Association. It was inaugurated by Health Minister, Dr Tsering Wangchuk on 31 August 2012. In the same year, a new Mazda ambulance was replaced by La Casa del Tibet and Roadway of Tibet.

Under the aegis of the Department, the administration of the health center is handled by the 11-member local health committee. The daily works of the health center and its sub-centers are supervised by the hospital administrator. The health centers operate with 14 staff: 1 hospital administrator, 1 accountant, 1 staff nurse, 8 community health workers and 1 pharmacist and 2 drivers.

Primary Health Center, Bhandara

Bhandara health centerThe Norgyeling Tibetan settlement was established in 1972 to accommodate 5,000 people. However, extreme climatic conditions and unsuitable environment, many have lost their lives and many others migrated to other places. As of April 2013, the settlement has a population of 1198.

In 1973, the settlement had a small dispensary run by a nurse appointed by the settlement office. In 1981, the Department renamed the clinic as Norgyeling Health Center. The Department took full charge of the health center in April 2001. Prior to that, the settlement office raised the entire administrative costs of running the health center. Even after taking the full charge of the health center by the Department, the settlement office continues to assist in electing the health committee members and its chairman as per the established rules and guidelines.

Primary Health Center, Bir and Chauntra

PHC, BirThe health center was established in 1967. At that time, it was a tent clinic with two paramedical workers and an Indian visiting doctor. It was managed by the Tibetan Industrial Rehabilitation Society (T.I.R.S). It provided health care services to three settlements, viz. Bir Dege Division, Nagchen Division and Bir Tibetan Society, which were established in 1966 with an initial population of 2,000. These settlements today have a combined population of 7,552 that include 5 monasteries and 4 schools.

In 1981, the center was upgraded into a primary health care center with 12 rooms, a kitchen and a bathroom. The construction of new health center was sponsored by a group of Tibetans residing in Switzerland and the Swiss Zonta club. The land for the PHC was donated by His Eminence DZongsar Khentse Rinpoche of Dege Division, Bir. Inpatient room and testing laboratory were added in 1992. In 2005, further extension was made with donation from Venerable Ogyen Topyal Rinpochen of Bir Nangchen Division. In 2008, the health center further constructed residence quarters for a Doctor, hospital administrator, staff nurse and the lab/x-ray technician. A hall with a seating capacity of 100 was also constructed for organizing health education activities. Moreover, health center also provides comprehensive basic care to the Chauntra Tibetan settlement population of 868.

Primary Health Center, Miao

PHC MiaoChoephelling Tibetan settlement was first established in the remote area of Changlang in Arunachal Pradesh with an initial population of about 1,600 in 1972. Later, in 1976, the settlement was shifted to Miao, which had relatively better transportation and communication links with the rest of the country. The town of Miao is located in the Changlang District of north-east Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh.

The primary health center at Miao started as a small dispensary with a single nurse. The center was rebuilt at the present location in 1978. Further renovation works in 1996 extended the in-patient ward of the health center. With four resident nurses, fully equipped with basic diagnostic and treatment facilities, the health center today serves the medical needs of the settlement population of 2,907 (as of 2012).

Clinics

 

The Department runs a network of fourty three clinics in the scattered Tibetan Settlements across India and Nepal. Since there are no permanent resident doctor in these clinics, they provide only outpatient services to not only Tibetans, but a significant local Indian and Nepalese population as well. All these clinics, except a few, are staffed by a community health worker with a visiting doctor once every week or two weeks.

The health center is well equipped with all the basic diagnostic and treatment facilities, including OPD, BP machine, thermo meter, ear checkup, sugar testing machine, pregnancy test and weighing machine. The center also implements health services like free immunization to the children under the age of five, free medication to the people officially attested as the poorest of poor, etc.

Health programs carried out by these health centers also include MCH (Mother Child Health) and RH (Reproductive Health) program, DOT (Direct observed Therapy) program and to avail information regarding both communicable and chronic diseases and their prevention. And health related events are organised as per direction of Department. The clinic is administered by the settlement officer and a community health worker works under. The clinics located in the areas of Nepal are administered by the (SLF) Snow Lion Foundation under the guidance of Department of Health, CTA.

Paljorling Clinic, Pokhara

Paljorling ClinicPaljorling health center was established in 1990 with a purpose to provide health care facilities to the Tibetan People living in and around the settlement. It is very helpful to the community  in terms of consultation or treatment for minor illness. Moreover people can avail of 25% discount on medicines. Health center works efficiently under the supervision of SLF. Community health worker also arrange health awareness talks among the people.

Jampaling Clinic, Pokhara

Jampaling Pokhara

Since 1984, Jampaling health care center has been providing basic health care services to 665 Tibetan residents. A single community health worker runs the health center with the assistance of settlement office and the department. Health center works much more efficiently after the administration charge has been taken over by the Snow Lion Foundation. It has the basic amenities to cure common diseases and also promote health awareness program among theTibetans and local people. Moreover, the Tibetan residents are offered 25% discount on the medicines.

Lo Tserok Clinic

Lo TseroLotserokClinick Namgyaling Tibetan refugee settlement was first established in 1972 with and initial population of 300. It is located at Marpha village in Mustang, about 250 kms away from the Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal. The primary occupation of the settlers are farming. As of 2013, the settlement shelters 250 people. The settlement health centre was first established in 1996. The health centre with one community health worker is fully equipped to provide basic medical treatment services. The centre has been operating under the close supervision of the Snow Lion Foundation and the local settlement office.

Shaybru Clinic

ShyabruClinicThe primary health centre at the Gegyeling settlement in Shaybru was first established in 1991. The Department has been managing this health center through the Snow Lion Foundation. The health center procures essential drugs with funding assistance from Mrs Esther of Tibet Forever, Switzerland. The health center has been operating successfully with one community health worker under the close supervision of the local settlement office.

Walung Clinic

Walung clinicThe primary health centre at the Sampheling settlement in Walung was established in 1972. The management and funding for the health centre was undertaken by the Snow Lion Foundation. The Department took full charge of the health centre in 1991. The health centre today operates with one community health worker under the close supervision of the Snow Lion Foundation.

Chialsa Clinic

Chailsa health workerThe primary health centre at the Delekling settlement in Chialsa was established and managed by the Swiss Red Cross Society in 1963. From 1966, the local settlement office took charge of the management of the health centre, while the Carpet Trading Centre provided funds for its operating cost. The management and funding of the health centre was taken over by the Department in 1991. The health centre is well-equipped to provide basic diagnostic and treatment services. The centre today has one community health worker (appointed by the Department) who works under the close supervision of the local settlement office.

Manang Clinic

The clinic in Manang settlement was established to provide basic primary health care services to the local populace. Given the extremely remote location of the settlement, the daily maintenance of the clinic suffered considerable difficulties. The community health worker of the clinic was therefore moved to another clinic in the same place, which was run by the Rotary Club of Germany. The health centre since then has been operating successfully with one community health worker under the close supervision of the local settlement office and the Snow Lion Foundation. The operating cost of the health centre is provided by donations of various foreign donors.

Dorpatan Clinic, Pokhara

DhorpatanClinicThe Primary health centre was established in 1989 in order to provide basic health services to a population of over 200. The clinic today has been operating successfully with one community health worker under the close supervision of the local settlement office and the Snow Lion Foundation. The operating cost of the health centre is covered by donations from various foreign donors.

Tashi Palkhiel Clinic

IMG_5092Tashi Palkhiel Tibetan Refugee settlement was established on 1962 on the total area of 120 rupani of land. The main sources of livelihood for the settlers are carpet weaving and small business. This settlement is located at Kaski Distt. of Nepal. The settlement consist of only village with 182 families and the present population of 976. The settlement avail with one modern allopathic dispensary and one staff nurse to provide basic medical treatment services.

Tashiling Clinic, Pokhara

Tashiling ClinicWith funding from the Department, the health centre at the Tashiling Tibetan refugee settlement was built to provide basic health care services to a population of 511. The health centre functions with a one health community with close involvement of the members of the local health committee. The health centre is well-equipped with basic diagnostic and treatment facilities.

Jorpati Clinic, Kathmandu

JorpatiClinicThe primary health care centre at the Tibetan settlement in Jorpati was established in August 1993. The population of the Tibetan settlement in Jorpati has increased marginally from initial 204 to 224 (as of 2012). Under the close supervision of the local settlement office and the Snow Lion Foundation, the health centre operates with one community health worker and a visiting doctor every Wednesday.

Boudha Clinic, Kathmandu

Boudha ClinicThe primary health centre at the Tibetan settlement in Boudha was established in the early 1970’s by the Snow Lion Foundation in order to provide basic health services to the local settlement populace, which has diminished from the initial 500 to 137 (as of 2012). The health centre today operates with one community health worker under the close supervision of the Snow Lion Foundation. The health centre is well-equipped with basic diagnostic and treatment facilities.

Tuting Clinic

Tuting ClinicThe first ever Tibetan settlement officer was appointed on 15 April 2013. Prior to this it was under the administration of Tezu settlement office. Tuting is situated in a very remote area and some villagers are settled around the India Tibet border of northeastern state of Arunachal Pradesh. The region combined 17 small villages scattered over and population of nearly 1081 initially. The present health center in the settlement was established by the Department in 1995 with the contribution fund from settlement people. The health center today operates with one staff nurse and one community health worker. The health center operates under the close supervision of the local settlement office.

Srinagar Clinic

Srinagar ClinicUpon request from the local Tibetan Muslim community in Srinagar, the capital of northern Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir, the community health centre was established to provide basic health services to an initial population of a few hundreds. The population today has grown to over a thousand people. The health centre operates with one health worker and is well-equipped to provide basic health services.

Ravangla and Gangtok Clinic

Ravangla ClinicThe Ravangla Tibetan settlement is situated in the north-eastern Indian state of Sikkim. The settlement initially sheltered 810 people. Its population today is 1,275. Since the settlement health centre was established in 1989, it has been operating with one community health worker. The centre also has a dental section. Every year dentists from France visit the centre to offer free check up to the settlement people. In addition to day-to-day common medical services, the health centre in collaboration with the local Tibetan settlement office, undertakes a wide range of public health programs and events.

In addition, health staff also visits twice a month to Gangtok scattered Tibetan settlers to provide medical services and availing Doctor during her visit.

Tashiling Clinic, Sonada

Sonada ClinicThe Tashiling Tibetan settlement in Sonada is located in the eastern Indian state of West Bengal. The settlement’s health centre was established in the 1980’s in order to provide basic health care services to the Tibetan settlers, as well as the local Indian population in and around Sonada, Tung and Dilaram. The area had a combined total population of around 30,000 in 2013.

The centre has been operating under the supervision of the settlement office. The centre has one community health worker (appointed by the Health Department) and one staff nurse (appointed by the settlement office with funding assistance from Shenpen Tibet Aid in Norway). In addition, the centre also has a visiting doctor once every week. A doctor of traditional Tibetan medicine, based in the nearest hill town of Darjeeling, also visits the centre once every two weeks. All emergency cases are referred to the nearest hospital in Darjeeling or Siliguri. In addition to medical services, the centre also undertakes numerous public health initiatives.

Tezu Clinic

Tezu phcThe Dhargyeling Tibetan Settlement in Tezu was established in 1962 with an initial population of nearly 900. Tezu is located in the northeastern Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh. The present health center in the settlement was established by the Department in 1980. The health center today operates with one staff nurse, two health workers and one driver. As of April 2013, the post of staff nurse was vacant and the Department was in the process of appointing a new nurse. The health center operates under the close supervision of the local settlement office. Given the remote location of the settlement, the ambulance service provided by the center has been extremely beneficial to the local populace.

Tenzingang Clinic

Tenzingang ClinicThe Tenzingang Settlement in the northeastern Indian border state of Arunachal Pradesh was established in the year 1972 with an initial population of 34 families. The population in and around Bomdilla has grown over the years to about 900 people today. The settlement initially had a small clinic with two temporary staff working under the supervision of the local settlement office. The clinic was upgraded in the early 1990’s by constructing a double-storey building with multiple rooms serving as inpatient ward, dressing room, doctor’s cabin, pharmacy and medicine store room. The clinic basically had all the basic amenities that one could find in a hospital. The construction of building and provision of new medical equipment for the clinic was funded by Mrs Daniel Mitterand Foundation, France. As the donation came through the tireless efforts of the Dewatsang family, the clinic was named after their late father Mr. Kunga Samten. The clinic today is known as K.S. Memorial Clinic.

The clinic today operates with two medical staff who work under the direct supervision of the local settlement office.

 

Rajpur Clinic

Rajpur ClinicThe Tibetan settlement at Rajpur is located on the outskirts of Dehradun. The settlement initially had a population of 500. The settlement’s health centre was established by the local Tibetan Women Centre in 1970. Since the Department took full charge of the health centre in 1992, it has been working under the close supervision of the Dekyling hospital. The health centre has one community health worker and is fully equipped to provide basic medical services to the settlement people, numbering 387 in 2013.

Kamrao Clinic

DSC08817The Kamrao Tibetan settlement is located at an extremely remote location in the north Indians state of Himachal Pradesh. The nearest town of Paonta Sahib is located at a distance of about 40 kms. The Tibetan settlement at Kamrao was initially established with a population of about 500. The settlement’s health care center was first established by the Tibetan Industrial Rehabilitation Society. The health center functioned with one community health worker.

The Department eventually took over the management of the health center. Doctors from the Dharamshala-based Delek Hospital visits the health center at least four times a year. The Department upgraded the health center by renovating the old building and constructing a new staff quarter in 1998. The settlement had a population of 212 in 2012. The health center today functions with one community health worker under the close supervision of the local settlement office.

 

Puruwala Clinic

Puruwala ClinicThe health center is located in the settlement of Sakya Tibetan Society Puruwala, which was established in 1969 with the guidance and blessings of His Eminence Sakya Trinzin Rinpoche. The health care center was set up in 1983 and provides basic health care services to a population of 725 today. The clinic basically has two rooms: main clinic and dressing room. The clinic at present has one community health worker who works under the direct supervision of the local settlement office as per the established rules and regulations set by the Health Department.

Sataun Clinic

Sataun ClinicThe Satuan Tibetan settlement is situated at a remote location in the north Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. The settlement was initially established with a population of 500 Tibetans refugees. The nearest town of Paonta Sahib is located at a distance of 20 kms. The settlement today has a population of 215.

The primary health center was first established by the Tibetan industrial Rehabilitation Society. The health center was run by one community health worker and a visiting doctor every week. After the Department eventually took charge of the health center, Doctors from the Dharamshala-based Delek Hospital visited the health center at least four times a year. With funding assistance from the Italian Association for Solidarity among Peoples, the Department built a new health center with staff quarters. The Rajpur chapter of Swedish Organization for Individual Relief assisted the health center in procuring adequate supply of essential drugs. The health center today operates with one health worker under the close supervision of the local settlement office.

Khera and Lakhanwala Clinic

Khera ClinicThe Khera Tibetan settlement was established in 1969 by the rehabilitation center, headquarter Est no. 22, Government of India to felicitate the ex-soldiers of Special Frontier Force for their unprecedented service to the Indian Military. The settlement is located near Lakhanwala, Uttarakhand state.

A staff nurse at the center works under the supervision of settlement office and the department. All the expenses of the health center is borne by the department of health, CTA. It provides basic health care services and visits twice in week to Lakhanwala settlement, population of 468.

It has three sections including a dispensary room, a dressing room and two-bedded patient room. Health center also initiates health education program in the community as per the direction of the Department.

Dhondupling and Lingtsang Clinic

clementown copyThe Tibetan Settlement at Clementown was founded by the late Gungthang Tsultrim in 1964 and was initially known as Tibetan Nehru Memorial Foundation (TNMF). Presently, it is called Dhondupling Tibetan Settlement as conferred by His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 1966. During the foundation of this settlement, primary health care center was initiated under the administration of TNMF settlement office. It has a prime purpose to provide health care services to 3000 Tibetan inhabitants as per 2013.

Mrs. Khando Chagzolshang, the general secretary of Tibetan Homes Foundation, Mussoorie has shouldered the responsibility of all the medical expenses and the salary of two staff nurses for three years until 1989. Eventually, the department took charge and appointed one community health worker at the health center. The health care center building is under the registration of settlement office and it is functioning under the direct supervision of community health worker and the settlement office. Besides providing health care facilities, it also organizes health talk on various diseases to educate the common masses for a healthy community and visits Lingtsang Tibetan settlement thrice a week, today has a population of 505.

Paonta Sahib Clinic

Tibetan Industrial Rehabilitation Society Poanta has started the Primary health center at Tibetan settlement in 1969. It is situated near Paonta Sahib at a distance of 4km away from the city and 48 km away from Dehradun. Single community health worker serves the settlement populace of 576 approximately. Since 1984, the department took over the responsibility and manages the primary health care center through the settlement office. It has every basic facility to cure the minor illness and refers the patient to the bigger hospital in need. It also provides health awareness talk, gives health education regarding the communicable diseases.

Khampagar Clinic, Tashijong

Tashijong health CenterThe primary health center at khampagar was established in October 1973 by H.E the late 8th Khamtrul Rincpoche. It was intended to provide basic medical care to the monks and the lay people of Khampagar. The department also arranged an additional staff nurse as felt and appealed by the Khampagar society. The health center is functioned with two-health workers, a laboratory and a visiting doctor who visits the center twice a week. The institute also observes health awareness program in the community. The Tibetan craft community and the department administer it. There are 661 resident in the settlement including monks and nuns at Dhongyu Gyatseling Nunnery.

Dalhousie Clinic

20130122_104034[1]The health center in Dalhousie was first set up by the local Tibetan people in the early 1970’s. At that time, the local Tibetan population in this town of north Indian state of Himachal Pradesh numbered more than a thousand. Located within the Tibetan Handicraft Center at Middle Bakrota, Dalhousie, the health center’s management was eventually handed over to the Department in 1983. The health center operates with one health worker under the close supervision of the local settlement office.

Dholanji Clinic

Dholanji clinicDholanji Tibetan settlement is located in the north Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. The settlement has a total population of 652, which also includes a significant number of monks and nuns. The settlement’s health centre was established in 1987. Operating with one community health worker, the health centre is fully equipped to provide basic medical services to the settlement people. Patients who require hospital care or consultation of specialists are promptly referred the hospital located in the nearest town of Solan.

Rewalsar and Pondoh Clinic

The Rewalsar Primary Health Care Center was established in September 1987 by the Health Department in order to provide health care services to the Tibetan people in Rewalsar and Pondoh. As of April 2013, the town has a population of 300 and 240 in Pondoh settlement. The health worker also visits twice a week to Pondoh settlement. The clinic operates with one community health worker, under the close supervision of the concerned settlement office. The clinic is well equipped to provide basic diagnostic and treatment services.

Kullu Manali Clinic

Kullu ClinicThe Kullu dispensary was established in 1981. It is located inside the premises of a school near River Beas. At that time the population of the settlement was around 250 (now reduced to 200). The clinic was initially administered by the Education Department of CTA. The Health Department later took full charge of the clinic. The local settlement officer supervises the daily functioning of the clinic. Health staff visits once in a week to 15 Mile, Manali and Patlikul to provide health neeeds in these settlements.

 

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